Friday, January 29, 2010

B is for

Bedspread.

I took this bedspread from my parents' attic many, many years ago. Being young, I never thought that someday I'd want to know the bedspread's history. And that when I wanted to know, nobody would be around to ask.



Who crocheted the bedspread? Was it my mother? My Grandma or Aunt Emma? Was it a gift? Who was it made for?

When was it made? Did my Mom patiently crochet it as she waited for V-mail from my Dad? Did Grandma or Aunt Emma pull it out in the evenings after long, hard days of working as housekeepers?

Perhaps my cousin Kathy can tell me if this bedspread is a twin to one that her mother crocheted. But then I wonder if my Aunt Marie and my Mom/Grandma/Aunt Emma would work on their bedspreads together? Did they share patterns? Did they advise and help each other?

As I look at it, I have more questions. The bedspread is dirty and damaged. Can it be fixed?





If the bedspread can be repaired, will it be so fragile that I'll be afraid to use it? Or will I lovingly place it on our bed and think about other people, other times?

10 comments:

stringplay said...

How lovely! Every textile has a story. Perhaps you'll have to imagine yours. Or write it?

Such a wonderful repeating pattern. I love how it looks different as your eyes move around the pattern.

yarnjourney said...

The bedspread is lovely. Try soaking it in OxyClean, even overnight is OK. That stuff is amazing for getting age out of old linens. Both holes look like they would be easy fixes. It looks like the seams of the blocks are torn, not the blocks themselves. I could be wrong, but from the photo that is what I see.

Susan said...

Isn't it a shame that by the time we know we have questions, the ones to ask are gone? I think if you fix it, you should use it because that's why it was made.

minipurl said...

THat is beautiful and the family history aspect makes it all the more special.
Try using Z'out on it. I once got baby vitamin (iron) stains out of a baby's first Christmas Santa sleeper. Nice and white now, except for the little red trim. Ho, ho, ho!

Diane said...

That's a lovely bedspread. I have an old beat up quilt that came from my grandmother. I don't think she made it but I'd still like to know it's history since it must be close to 100 years old.

And, now I'm going to start taking better notes about all the shawls I knit because someday, somebody may want to know who made them!

DeuceMom said...

I love the bedspread and your writing. If you make such an heirloom, remind yourself to write down your story so that someday someone can ooh and aah over your masterpiece

Gail said...

You could possibly sew a backing on it to make it more sturdy. Then happily put it on you bed.

RedScot said...

Lovely story. I agree with Gail to try and add a backing to make it stronger. It's beautiful

Lori said...

First I was blown away by how beautiful the bedspread is. Then I totally related to your comments about not asking the right questions while the people who could answer them were still around. It is sad to have unanswered questions about our family history, but you can still take comfort in knowing that one of the women in your family put her love and spirit into that textile.

Kim said...

That's so lovely! I hope you're able to get it cleaned and repaired and are able to use it one day.